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20130218
20130218
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Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
that print only the nixon materials. by law, richard nixon's materials could not leave 20 miles outside of the district of columbia because it was felt that richard nixon was not a trustworthy conservator of his material. so they couldn't have a library. by law, he couldn't have a live repaired and that is because richard nixon had cut a deal and congress found out about it. he cut a deal with one of his appointees who was the head of the gao. i'm sorry, the gsa. it is the government services administration appeared at those -- in those days, they ran the national archives. the deal was that richard nixon would have the tapes in five years and could destroy whatever he wanted. whatever was not presented for truck, he could destroy and he could have his papers and destroy them appeared richard nixon cut this deal before he left the white house. congress found out about it, went crazy and seized his materials. that meant that the nixon materials were like a crime scene. i am telling you, running the nixon library is one of the most phenomenal experiences one could have. because what happe
remarkable icons. east dwight eisenhower and richard nixon. the two men were at the center of the american political stage for over to the p.o. decades. it's even though nixon was eisenhower's vice-president, said they had a tense and often distrustful relationship. he writes about it in his new book. i spoke with him a little bit earlier. you remember eisenhower as a war hero and richard nixon as the disgraced president brought low by watergate. worthy meant more similar than we think? >> there personalities could not have been more different. nixon would always be nixon, always insecure. eisenhower but always be eisenhower. i asked somebody what he was like and they said that he would go all five star on you. >> eisenhower was very suspicious of political -- corera politicians. why did he choose him? >> he did not choose them. when eisenhower was nominated for president in 1952, he was not even aware that he made a choice. i am the one who does it? as opposed to the delegates. yes, it is you. >> why was the relationship so difficult for nixon? >> nixon was always wasawe of eisenhower. ni
in congress, bringing his mandate down to size. democrats try to do the same thing to richard nixon in '73, even before watergate. chris: you think it's a normal pattern? everyone agree we're watching normal intransigence? i'm watching them fight this hagel nomination so far successfully. they don't seem like they're in awe of the president at all. >> no, but i think it's weakened a little bit. the unanimousty of republicans weakened. we saw republicans break off agree on the fiscal cliff deal. we saw breakoff on the sandy aid and starting to see some break off on immigration. it's certainly true they continue to be very hard on the president but not quite as hard as they were much of the first term. >> we know historically, the second -- chris: you know being in the cook report that's the hardest job in the world, get re-elect your party -- >> re-elected. if you then are showing all of your time as opposition party to soften up democrats, not about the president now, it's about the party and taking control of the senate. chris: let's take in the most vivid example this week, hagel, secret
or republican. i voted for richard nixon, ronald reagan, but after the george bush fiasco, the republicans will not give back the tax cuts that george bush's friends liked and they still like thim. they want to get rid of things people need like social security and medicare. host: paul is a republican. caller: good morning. favorite is george bush. host: george w. or george h. w.? caller: george w. bush. host: why? out, iot going to find guess. let's go to democratic caller in iowa. caller: good morning. my favorite is john f. kennedy. he was brilliant. when he gave his inaugural address, he started the peace corps and he brought young kids to help out with the country. he and his brothers were for the poor. it was not just for the rich. he's my favorite. thank you. host: we will keep getting your thoughts on your favorite president throughout the first part of the morning. let me give you some other headlines in the papers. the new york times front page -- next to that is the story about obama's plan for citizenship that was put out on saturday. it says none of the 11 million illegal immi
, richard nixon. >> i'm going to go with president obama. >> that would be correct, sir. >> wow! can we double down? can we triple down? >> which president briefly kept two bears of pets on the white house lawn? >> thomas jefferson, james monroe, andrew jackson, chester arthur. >> james monroe. >> jackson. >> you can't give two answers. what is that? >> thomas jefferson. >> they win. >> congratulations. >> the old guys. >> leonard cooper, thanks. >>> coming up live, when to call it quits in your relationship. but first these messages. [ male announcer ] this is bob, a regular guy with an irregular heartbeat. the usual, bob? not today. [ male announcer ] bob has afib: atrial fibrillation not caused by a heart valve problem, a condition that puts him at greater risk for a stroke. [ gps ] turn left. i don't think so. [ male announcer ] for years, bob took warfarin, and made a monthly trip to the clinic to get his blood tested. but not anymore. bob's doctor recommended a different option: once-a-day xarelto®. xarelto® is the first and only once-a-day prescription blood thinner for patient
. >> i think ronald reagan changed the trajectory of america, in a way that, you know, richard nixon did not. and in a way that bill clinton did not. >> i'm sure bill clinton didn't hear that. anyway, president clinton landed in hot water after he declared candidate obama's prior to that in jesse jackson. >> jesse jackson won south carolina twice in '84 and '88. senator obama is not a good campaign here. he's a good candidate. >> well, there you have it. let me ask you about a deeper question, not the cheap shots and the obvious analysis based on either side's point of view. and you know this better than anybody. the natural rivalry, the stuff that just happens because you have to be a rival. if barack obama is a transformational president, he's the guy that has the democratic successor elected. he's the guy that starts a real era? can he win and the clintons not win? or is there a natural rivalry here? >> well, there is a natural rivalry. but, right now, that i hey're inextricably linked. that's what's interesting about this moment in history for the first time, really, starting with th
the education, i like the training, i particularly like the gun -- at the end. richarde wasn't come in nixon's turn, the lift of a driving dream. >> colby? >> i don't think it was supposed to be that kind of address. i think he laid out an agenda, and agenda he wants to pursue. i think he will achieve some of it. something will happen with immigration reform, i believe. i think he will get something on guns. there is a movement and he hit it just right with the tone. minimum wage will be the traditional fight. he was right to lay out the agenda he wants. he will get very little support from republicans. >> nina, on a scale from a to f, how would you rate the speech? >> b +. although there was a surgeon laundry-list element to the speech, which there is to every state of the union, in the end it ended on a high note and passionate note about guns, and there was an overall tone which was center-left but reasonable. he did not come off looking silly and sort of way over the top. it was a far more restrained speech and then you would think he would get from a "liberal liberal." >> charle centss
and was not removed from office. richard nixon left office and was not removed. they were eligible to receive benefits provided to former presidents. it is not tested whether somebody removed by impeachment would receive these benefits. host: a right-wing response to the comments about george w. bush saying he saved your hide from the terrorists. when do the presidents receive this money? is it one payout each year or monthly? guest: i believe it is a monthly pension. i do not think they get one installment. host: do the presidents request the amount of money they need for different things and break it down for the government? guest: they talk to the office of management and budget. it comes out in the president's budget recommendations about what they have said they will need for that year. a lot of it is set by statute. office space is negotiated through gsa. host: we will go to bill, arlington, texas, independent caller. caller: thank you for taking my call. i was a teacher years back. this was one of the projects i gave on the benefits and pensions for presidents. i was amazed at the research that
timothy naftali.he was the director of the richard nixon potential library and museum from 2007 until 2011. >> when you did the 149, peoplee who serve in the nixon administration, how did you raise the money to do that? andhey had buyer's remorse a group of alumni of the nixon administration who worked on the domestic side rallied and raise a lot of money for this program. i received contributions from donald rumsfeld. i believe dick cheney. i think paul o'neill provided some funding. member people. the fault of the domestic side of the head ministration hasn't received the b.j. of the administration hasn't received -- the domestic side of the administration has not received that much attention. for the watergate interviews, i used the trust fund. i was very conservative about the way i used the money. the library received one head- one half of all of the ticket money that came into the library card -- one half of the ticket money that came into the library. that money was our trust fund. i used the money for public programming because the nixon foundation shut down all funding. normally,
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)